To download the clip art and animated GIFs on this site, just move your mouse over an image or animation and right-click. Then select "Save Picture As..." (or "Save Image As" if you're using a Mac). Feel free to open the pictures in your favorite graphics software, such as Photoshop, Fireworks, Gimp, etc... and edit if you wish. Keep in mind that linking to these images is not permitted.
If you mean your own artwork, then you'd take a picture of it, upload it to your computer (make sure you know where you're saving it), then select Insert > Picture in Word, browse in the location where you saved the photo, click the picture, and insert. If you mean an image from the internet or something, you can just save it to your computer and basically follow the rest of the steps above.
WPClipart: is here to maintain and grow an online collection of artwork for schoolkids and others that is free of copyright concerns as well as safe from inappropriate images. To ensure these qualities, no direct user-uploaded images are allowed. All artwork is collected/edited or created for use by me with the GIMP, Inkscape and some GIMP extras on Absolute Linux. Please email me if you have any questions or concerns. And thanks for stopping by :-)
oh ya I used to use clip art all the time and I just loved clip art even though a lot of the art was cheesy, but you could definitely find what you needed or close to it. I just tried using the clip art on the new system and because I have a mac its harder to use. I'm having a hard time figuring out how to resize it put it behind text all that. I wish they would bring it back
To download the clip art and animated GIFs on this site, just move your mouse over an image or animation and right-click. Then select "Save Picture As..." (or "Save Image As" if you're using a Mac). Feel free to open the pictures in your favorite graphics software, such as Photoshop, Fireworks, Gimp, etc... and edit if you wish. Keep in mind that linking to these images is not permitted.
Back in the ‘90s, Clip Art took over Word and PowerPoint files thanks to the thousands of office workers and students who used the images as a way to “improve” their documents. These days there are a large number of free images available on the web, and Microsoft is recognizing this by killing off its Clip Art portal in recent versions Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook. “The Office.com Clip Art and image library has closed shop,” explains Microsoft’s Doug Thomas. “Usage of Office’s image library has been declining year-to-year as customers rely more on search engines.”
Which brings us to Creative Commons, the license Office’s new Bing-powered search filters for. My colleague Danny explained what Creative Commons is, and why you should use it What Is Creative Commons, And Should You Use It? What Is Creative Commons, And Should You Use It? Creative Commons is a set of licenses which automatically give you permission to do various things, such as reuse and distribute the content. Let's find out more about it and how to use it. Read More , but the quick version is that it’s a way for artists to tell the web their images are free to use.
I just got a new computer with Windows 10. Naturally, I had to download several "new" programs, Word, Excel, Power Point. I am so upset that they have removed the Clip Art feature from Word. I used this all the time when publishing our community news letter and calendar. I am looking for an easy to use replacement, but so far, no luck. Any suggestions? Thanks.

The download marketplace offers a variety of products and resources that you can download to create better documents and presentations. This download section contains add-ons for Microsoft Office like this Attachmetric that helps to tracks who has opened your emails and attachments or ClearContext Professional to prioritize, organize, color-code, manage Outlook in a better way.


This applies more to teachers than to anyone else, but clip art (especially black line clip art) can´t be beat when it comes to using images that are going to be photocopied. It creates a much cleaner look than a photo. While there is much talk of going digital, the reality is that most of the world still is using paper for teaching . . . and a lot of it, not because we aren´t open to the digital world, but many times not all students have access.
As an artist I resent some people's assumption that original art from my abilities and imagination, which I have sacrificed a lot to develop, should somehow default to public property. If we require artists to participate in a money economy their art belongs to them. Copying images and not following the copyright owners permissions to the letter is stealing, outright. And deep pockets like Disney has taught individuals that the hard way.
Is there a potential downside? Yes. Just because a search engine sees something as Creative Commons doesn’t necessarily mean that it is. Here at MakeUseOf, for example, we’ve had at least one photographer threaten to sue us over an image he didn’t realize he himself licensed as Creative Content. He backed down when we pointed this out, and it’s one example resulting from thousands of blog posts spread over a decade, but know that this isn’t without risk.

I just got a new computer with Windows 10. Naturally, I had to download several "new" programs, Word, Excel, Power Point. I am so upset that they have removed the Clip Art feature from Word. I used this all the time when publishing our community news letter and calendar. I am looking for an easy to use replacement, but so far, no luck. Any suggestions? Thanks.


I liked it for the simple inserting of visual effects for creating newsletters. Pictures do enhance communication and the ease of using a word document and gathering an image made this task easy. Now having to go outside of my document to find the extra spice my documents need makes this less fun. I have always used animated images that were less than artistic but were entertaining. Like others I will miss this service, but I understand progress is not always comfortable.
My colleague Chris compared Google Image search to Bing Bing Images vs. Google Images - Which Has Better Results? Bing Images vs. Google Images - Which Has Better Results? Bing’s image search once challenged Google, offering more features and a better design. With infinite scrolling and the ability to search for similar images, Bing was legitimately better than Google at image search just a... Read More , and found Google’s results to be better. If you feel the same way, don’t worry: you can use it to find rights-cleared images. While searching for an image, click Search Tools then Usage Rights.
I used clipart a LOT for newsetters and other documents. I don't always want a photo - clipart is often better at getting an idea across quickly, and I didn't need to worry about copyright because I assumed it was OK to use without permission as it was a part of the MS package. The BING option is terrible - very juvenile and hardly extensive with fewer than 50 options. And by-the-way, most of the online sites for "accessing clipart in MS Word 2010" still say to go to insert then click on clipart. Really - we hardly need such basic instructions when they aren't even correct anymore!
Clipart is used to create a web-design, you can also draw up bills, posters, make cards, collages and wallpapers. Thanks to ClipArt and its individual elements, the new image is created including all the elements; it looks like it’s a photomontage, a creation of new design. At the same time, it will be a big plus if ClipArt goes without a background, since you do not have to waste time removing it. What’s the format of this kind of image? These are wide known PNG and GIF formats; the images can be saved both with a background and without it. There are aslo scrapbook kits for creativity, which consist of png images; those are a set of elements and backgrounds. 

There it was, inside the program you were already using. Sure, it wasn’t pretty, but you could quickly add a visual highlight to your document or presentation. Even better: everything was rights-cleared, meaning you could use it in your document or PowerPoint presentation without the fear of legal repercussions Confused About Copyright Law? These Online Resources Can Help Confused About Copyright Law? These Online Resources Can Help It's a confusing subject, yes, but it's important that you wrap your head around it. If you're involved in any sort of creative work, these resources will help you do just that. Read More .


If you mean your own artwork, then you'd take a picture of it, upload it to your computer (make sure you know where you're saving it), then select Insert > Picture in Word, browse in the location where you saved the photo, click the picture, and insert. If you mean an image from the internet or something, you can just save it to your computer and basically follow the rest of the steps above.
Why is it that every time Microsoft make another edition of their software it makes it harder and harder to use. Seriously frustrated. Clipart was so darn useful. I was always ungrouping it to pull apart and use just some little images or to recolour to match my document / presentation. now I have to go and try and completely redraw things. This is a complete waste of time. Microsoft, you continue to be morons. Just once, I'd like to see an upgrade that actually added value and didn't make it harder for people to use. User UNfriendly. Seriously considering heading back to an earlier version of PowerPoint just so I can get that feature back.
×